Imagin Center

Imaging

Genesis offers a number of comprehensive, diagnostic modalities to ensure that you receive the best care in the region. Consisting of both inpatient and outpatient services, Genesis possess up-to-date technology that delivers beautiful, clean images, literally becoming the "eyes of medicine" in preventative care. Find a location near you.

We provide high-tech testing by an experienced staff including board certified and fellowship trained Radiologists, ARRT registered Radiologic Technologists, many of whom are certified in multiple disciplines, Radiology Registered Nurses, and support services staff.

Imaging Services 

Take a moment to look over our services below, and do not hesitate to contact our Imaging staff with any questions or concerns:

Angiography

Angiography before subtractionAngiography is an imaging technique used to visualize the inside of blood vessels. Contrast material is injected into the vessel using sterile technique and imaged using x-ray. The contrast, often referred to as "dye", causes the vessels to be visible on x-ray, and is useful for locating blockages or malformations in the arteries and veins. Access to the blood vessel is most commonly gained through the femoral artery in the groin area where it lies relatively near the surface. Using a guide wire and catheter (a thin flexible tube), dye is injected into the targeted blood vessel. Images are taken, usually 2-3 frames per second, and using a technique called Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), the overlying image of bones and organs are "canceled out" leaving only the vessels.

What to expect

Angiography after subtractionYou will be awake and alert, though you may be given medication to help you relax. Prior to the procedure, the femoral artery area (groin area) is cleaned with a scrub solution. After sterile draping is applied, the area is numbed with local anesthetic. The radiologist will use a needle to gain access to the artery. A guide wire will be threaded through the needle and advanced to the target area using fluoroscopic (x-ray) guidance. Once the guide wire is in the correct position the catheter is advanced down the wire and the wire removed. Because the area is numb, you shouldn't feel the guide wire or catheter. Contrast is injected through the catheter while images are made. It is important to remain motionless during imaging to ensure the best images possible. When the dye is administered, you may feel warm and also the urge to urinate. When the radiologist is done imaging all necessary areas, the catheter will be removed and hand held pressure applied for about 15 minutes to stop bleeding. After the procedure you will need to lie flat for 4-6 to allow the artery to heal. The radiologist will interpret the images and send a signed report to your ordering physician.

Cardiac Diagnostics 

The Cardiac Diagnostics Department at Genesis Medical Center is dedicated to providing a full range of diagnostic tests to determine how well your heart is working. The results of your tests allow your physician to determine the most appropriate treatment for you. Most of the tests can be completed on an outpatient basis.

For more information about Cardiac Diagnostics, Click Here

Computed Tomography (CT)

CT of the abdomen

A computerized axial tomography scan, more commonly called CAT or CT scan, uses x-rays and computers to make detailed painless images. A very thin beam of x-rays pass through your body from each of 360 degrees to make the data that is collected and assembled by computer into thin cross sectional images of the interior structures. The cross sectional images, or "slices", are similar to the slices in a loaf of bread, except the CT slices are much thinner, sometimes numbering in the hundreds for a single exam. If needed, the computer can assemble three dimensional models by "stacking" the slices together. Depending on the body part that is being examined, contrast media, commonly called "dye" may be given. Different contrast media are used for different purposes, but all serve to highlight a particular type of structure, setting it apart from surrounding structures of a similar density.

CT exams at Genesis are performed by registered Radiologic Technologists who are encouraged to successfully complete CT registry.

What to Expect

CT control room

 

CT exams are performed on a machine with a large hole in it. You will lie on a table that moves into the "donut hole". The x-ray tube and sensor across from it are inside the machine and move around the hole. Depending on which body part is being examined, the exam will take between 5 and 15 minutes. Please wear comfortable loose fitting clothes. Metal objects will affect the image, so if you have metal on your clothing you may be asked to change into a gown. For best results, lie as still as possible while the exam takes place. You may be asked to hold your breath for short periods. Although you will be alone in the scan room, your technologist will be monitoring you from the adjoining control room. 

The CT technologist will take a series of images appropriate to the body part being examined. The images will be sent to and stored on PACS. A Radiologist will interpret the images and dictate a report that with be typed and sent to the doctor that ordered the exam for you.

Mammography

A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast. A screening mammogram is used to look for breast disease in women who have no symptoms, that is, they appear to have no breast problems. Screening mammography usually involves 2 views (x-ray pictures) of each breast. For patients with breast implants, additional views may be needed to include as much breast tissue as possible. Women who are breastfeeding can get mammograms. They are asked to express their breast milk before coming in for their mammogram appointment. A diagnostic mammogram is used to diagnose breast disease in women who have breast symptoms. Additional views are taken of the breast with a diagnostic mammogram to more carefully evaluate your symptoms.

For more information or to schedule a mammogram, Click Here.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

As the name indicates, magnetic resonance images are made utilizing magnetism and resonance. Human bodies contain a large number of hydrogen atoms, as these are basic building blocks in water and fat. By placing your body inside a large magnet the hydrogen atoms will spin aligned with the field of that magnet instead of spinning in their usual random directions. Then the atoms are knocked out of this alignment with perturbing radiofrequency pulses. The axis of spin changes in a way that is controllable and predictable-and measurable using the resonance given off by the atoms as their spins change. Different tissues will "resonate" differently allowing a greatly detailed picture of their structure. MRI is an excellent tool for imaging soft tissues, however the high magnetic fields used require screening questions of every patient before their exam.

MRI exams at Genesis are performed by registered Radiologic Technologists who must successfully complete MRI registry.

What to Expect

MRI control roomYou will be asked a series of questions to identify any possible metals, implants or devices that may be unsafe to have within the magnetic fields. Although MRI exam times vary according to the specific body part being imaged, they generally take 30 to 90 minutes. Please wear comfortable loose fitting clothes that do not contain metal, and leave any jewelry at home. You will be asked to leave all metal objects, electronic devices and cards containing magnetic strips outside of the scan room. You will lie on a table that moves into a large tunnel like opening in the machine. You will be able to hear the technologist, who will monitor you from the adjoining control room. You will also be able to hear the scanning itself, which makes a thumping noise.

The MR technologist will take a series of images appropriate to the body part is being examined. The images will be sent to and stored on PACS. A Radiologist will interpret the images and dictate a report that with be typed and sent to the doctor that ordered the exam.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear Medicine bone imaging

Nuclear medicine scans are performed using small amounts of radiotracers (radioactive material sometimes referred to as radiopharmaceuticals) that are injected, ingested or inhaled into the body. Different radiotracers are used depending on the body part being targeted. A camera highly sensitive to radiation is then used to measure the radiation given off. The resulting images demonstrate structure and especially function. Because areas of high metabolic activity will accumulate a greater amount of radiotracer, these areas will be "hot". "Cold" areas indicate less activity. Nuclear medicine exams can demonstrate the movement of blood flow, the time it takes for food to pass out of the stomach, or the amount of bile moving out of the gallbladder.

What to Expect

You will be given a dose of radiotracer. Depending on your specific procedure, it may be injected into a vein with a needle, swallowed in a capsule, eaten mixed with food, or inhaled as a gas. It can take anywhere from several seconds to several days for the radiotracer to accumulate in the organ being studied, depending on the specific exam. Thus you may be imaged immediately, be asked to return in several hours, or even a day later. The images will be captured by a gamma camera that will be positioned near you as you lie on a table or sit in a chair. Most Nuclear Medicine exams will take approximately one hour to image. For best results please follow your technologist's instructions regarding position and hold as still as possible while the images are being made. 

A patient is prepared for nuclear medicine imagingThe Nuclear Medicine technologist will take a series of images appropriate to the body part being examined. You may be asked to wait while your technologist reviews the images with the radiologist to ensure no extra views are needed before releasing you. In some cases, the radiologist may order extra views to clarify the results of your exam. The Radiologist will interpret the images and dictate a report that with be typed and sent to the doctor that ordered the exam for you.

The radiotracer will decay naturally and be gone from your body in a few days.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound image of unborn babyUltrasound imaging, also called sonography, uses high frequency sound waves to produce images of internal organs and tissues. Because different tissues reflect sound differently, ultrasound exams are very useful in determining the size, shape and consistency (solid, liquid, mixed) of structures within the body. It is used to evaluate blood flow through major vessels and is able to visualize blockages, plaque and clots within the vessels. Because no x-rays are used, ultrasound is useful for monitoring pregnancies. Ultrasound is also useful for providing guidance for minimally invasive procedures such as a biopsy or thoracentesis.

Ultrasound exams at Genesis are performed by technologists registered with the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS). Our technologist must also successfully complete registry exams for Abdominal, Obstetrics, RVT, General Physics and Vascular Physics.

What to expect

Ultrasound exam of carotid arteries

An ultrasound exam will vary according to the specific body part being imaged, but in general will take approximately 30 to 60 minutes. Please wear comfortable loose fitting clothes. You will usually be asked to lie on a table. Warm gel will be applied to the area examined. The gel ensures good transmission of the sound waves. Your technologist will glide an instrument called a transducer across your skin. The transducer sends out the sounds waves and also receives the echoes that bounce back. These echoes are converted to a live real-time image that displays on the monitor.

Your technologist will capture "snapshots" appropriate to the body part being examined. The images will be sent to and stored on PACS. A Radiologist will interpret the images and dictate a report that with be typed and sent to the doctor that ordered the exam for you.

X-Ray

X-ray of stomach containing barium contrastX-ray pictures, or radiographs, have been used for over a century to produce diagnostic images of the body. X-rays are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes visible light. Unlike visible light, x-rays pass through the body, and because denser structures like bones block more of the x-rays than less dense structures, an accurate picture of the various densities is produced. Originally x-ray images were captured using glass plates, then for many years film was used. Recently digital capture using PACS (picture archiving communication system) has gained widespread use and has proven to be efficient and effective.

All radiologic technologists at Genesis are registered with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, (ARRT), are certified in CPR, and keep their state licensure current by obtaining continuing education credits throughout the year

What to Expect

You will be asked to remove any metallic or dense items from the area being examined, as these objects will block x-rays and obscure desired details. Depending on the exam you may need to put on a hospital gown. You may be given lead shielding to limit exposure to areas not directly x-rayed. You will be asked about your medical history as it pertains to the exam being done, and female patients will be asked if there is any possibility of pregnancy. Pregnant patients can be x-rayed if the benefits outweigh the risks, but extra precautions will be taken. Usually at least two or three exposures are made at different angles to one another, or in different positions. Your technologist will ask you to stop breathing for certain types of exams in order to limit motion.

Patient is positioned for an image of the chestFor best results, please remain still during the actual x-ray exposures because motion will cause the image to be blurry. Please tell your technologist if you have had prior x-rays of the body part you are having x-rayed because comparison of old x-rays to new ones is recommended when available. Please follow your technologist's instructions regarding position and breathing to avoid having to repeat a view.

You will be asked to wait while your technologist reviews the images and he/she may check them with the radiologist before releasing you. In most cases you may return to your usual routine immediately. A Radiologist will interpret the images and dictate a report that with be typed and sent to the doctor that ordered the exam for you.

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Contact Us

To schedule an imaging procedure, please call:

563-421-3200

For more information about our imaging services, please contact:

563-421-9729

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