Heart Clinical Trials

At Genesis Heart Institute, you may get an opportunity to enroll in a clinical trial that tests the safety and effectiveness of a new cardiovascular therapy. In the Quad Cities, you’ll find this option at the Heart Institute because we emphasize innovation so we can better help patients. If you’re interested in a clinical trial, ask your doctor about whether it’s right for you. We’ll help you explore all your treatment possibilities.

Participating in Clinical Trials

To help determine whether you’re eligible for a certain clinical trial, a health care professional will review your medical history. You also may need to receive health screenings, including blood and urine analysis. Your age, sex, previous treatments, type and stage of disease, and other health conditions could affect your eligibility.

If you qualify for a clinical trial, you can choose whether to take part. By enrolling, you’ll gain access to a promising treatment that’s not widely available, and you’ll contribute to medical research that may benefit other patients. But it’s important to remember that your condition may or may not improve during the study. And, like established therapies, new drugs or procedures may cause side effects.

Talk to your physician to make sure you fully understand what the clinical trial would involve. Even if you decide to take part, you may leave the study at any time.

Current Heart & Vascular Clinical Trials

Find cardiovascular clinical trials at Genesis that are now enrolling participants. Learn more about the Genesis Research Program here.

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  • Cardiac Research: BOLSTER

    The purpose of this study is to collect information on the safety and effectiveness of the LifeStreamâ„¢ Balloon Expandable Vascular Covered Stent.

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Bonnie Morris knows what it means to have surgery: she's had her left lung removed, heart bypass surgery and the placement of a pacemaker. But after being diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, Mrs. Morris didn't find relief through a complex, open-chest surgery--she had TAVR.

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