Rooted in Your Health. Rooted in Your Future.

Look around. Technology has advanced almost before our eyes.

Health care is not an exception. There have been amazing, life-sustaining and life-changing advances in medical treatments, medical technology and medical architecture.

Quick Facts about JCRHCFor more than 60 years, Jackson County Regional Health Center (JCRHC) has served the health needs of your family and your community with exceptional care. Now, with those technological advances in mind, your community hospital is looking 60 or more years into the future.

The board of Jackson County Regional Health Center is exploring options to determine the best path into the future.

Hospitals are changing as technology changes. Today’s health centers are more efficient, technologically “wired,’’ less focused on patients in beds and much more focused on health services provided on an outpatient basis. Today’s new health centers are patient and family friendly.


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Ask the President

Curt Coleman, President Critical Access HospitalsCurt Coleman, President of Jackson County Regional Health Center, leads the discussion of JCRHC's current status and future development. If you would like to send Curt a comment or question regarding JCRHC's future, please fill out the following form:

Jackson County Regional Health Center Aerial View

Options to Consider as a Community

The hospital board of trustees has hired engineers and consultants to assess the present Jackson County Regional Health Center facility and our market. No conclusions have been reached about the direction to take with the existing facility but the consultant reports have concluded that major portions of the existing facility are in either “poor condition,’’ or “fair condition.’’

Option 1: Rebuild/Remodel

Project would include extensive renovation over a period of 4 years. Project would include systems replacement – electrical, fire protection, mechanical, communication and alarm – and renovation of building interior.

Pros:
1. Reuses existing buildings
2. Improved wayfinding

Cons:
1. More expensive
2. Maintains surplus space
3. Lacks ideal department adjacencies
4. Poor adjacencies for clinic
5. Expansion/renovation of departments in place may be disruptive
6. Multi-year implementation
7. Limited building growth potential


Option 2: New Construction on Existing Campus

Project would be new construction on existing campus as existing facility is phased out. Project would be designed to meet present and future health needs of the community and would reflect transition in health care from inpatient focus to outpatient focus.

Pros:
1. Good wayfinding
2. Good departmental relationships
3. Keeps only the 2004 building
4. Lower cost option
5. Good visibility of entry from the south

Cons:
1. Multi-year implementation
2. Throw away cost associated with the interim mech/elec connections


Option 3: “Greenfield” New Construction

Project would be new construction on a greenfield site in Maquoketa. Project would be designed to meet present and future health needs of the community and would reflect transition in health care from inpatient focus to outpatient focus.

Pros:
1. Good wayfinding
2. Good departmental relationships
3. Potential for future expansion
4. Main Entrance faces Arcade Street

Cons:
1. Potential mixing of traffic at Emergency Department & beds
2. Main entrance is west facing

                 
             

Learn More

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the future of JCRHC?

A: JCRHC looks to continue its mission of service to the region by meeting the ever growing challenges facing hospitals today. The JCRHC Board of Trustees has identified two key strategies critical to our future. 1. Create a facility that reflects 21st century health care delivery. 2. Strengthen our affiliation to help us achieve higher quality at lower costs while improving patient access. We are exploring both of these with the help of consultants and input from the people in the region who we serve. Health care, and especially where and how it is provided, is changing rapidly.  The image of hospitals is changing, hospitals are becoming health centers; care is more likely to be provided on an outpatient basis with less focus on inpatient care. Over 92% of JCRHC revenue comes from outpatient care, yet we operate in a facility largely designed for inpatient care.

Q: What is the condition of JCRHC?

Facility ConditionA: Our hospital has served the region well for nearly 70 years but now is showing its age, especially compared to new, more efficient, technology adaptable health facilities. The original portion of the present facility was built in 1949. There were renovations and expansions in 1966, 1979, 2001 and 2004. A recently completed total facility study noted that large portions of the facility are now in “poor condition’’ or “fair condition’’, which is due to age rather than lack of maintenance.

Q: What are the options for a renovated or new JCRHC?

A: Because of the age and condition of the present facility, the estimated cost could reach $17 million just to renovate the current facility with NO improvements in care, efficiencies, or image.  A second option is construction of a new hospital on the existing site as the existing facility is phased out. A third option is construction of a new hospital at a new or “green field’’ site. The cost of new construction would be projected at $30-$35 million.

Q: How would new construction improve the care and services?

A: Today’s rural health centers focus heavily on outpatient care and with a holistic approach to health and wellness. Acute care beds are available when they are needed, but emergency services, outpatient diagnostics, surgery and rehab services have shaped the facility's needs. Our current facility was designed predominantly for inpatient care and cannot be cost effectively renovated to today’s standard of care delivery. Since the current facility is configured in “wings”, it lacks the flexibility to adapt to future needs. New construction would provide a “blank canvas” to create a health center matching the needs of the region now and in the future.   

Q: What would the cost mean to taxpayers?

A: Through prudent financial management, the hospital Board of Trustees is well-positioned to fund a facility through a combination of cash reserves (up to an estimated $20 million by 2018) and debt financing (most likely tax exempt revenue bonds or revenue notes). Our goal would be to fund construction without reliance on a significant increase in property taxes. County taxpayers do pay a hospital levy, but the levy tax rate has been stable or decreased in recent years. Over the past four years, the tax rate for the hospital has decreased: 1.095 (Fiscal Year 2014); 1.064 (FY15); 1.056 (FY16) and is at 1.041 so far in FY17.

Q: What is the economic impact of JCRHC?

A: The health center generates over $9 million in economic benefit annually (according to the Iowa Hospital Association), which comes in the form of retail sales, jobs and tax revenues. With over 150 employees, JCRHC is the 5th largest employer in Jackson County.